San Antonio’s Torch of Friendship


Sculpture just off River Walk is a step beyond the Alamo

The Torch of Friendship stands in the shadow of the Tower of Americas in San Antonio, Texas.

The Torch of Friendship stands in the shadow of the Tower of Americas in San Antonio, Texas.

The 1863 siege of the Alamo in San Antonio was part of the Mexican government’s attempt to maintain possession of the territory that today makes up Texas, and the ensuing massacre at this small Spanish mission has framed much of the history between Texas and Mexico. “Remember the Alamo,” is still an echo of that battle that ultimately resulted in Texas independence.

In 2002, the government that once fought in San Antonio gave the city a 65-foot sculpture as a token of its desire to move past the Alamo.

The Torch of Friendship (in Spanish, “La Antorcha de la Amistad”) stands at the intersection of East Commerce and Losoya streets in downtown San Antonio, just off the famed River Walk and in the shadows of the Tower of the Americas.

The sculpture is the work of world-renowned Mexican sculptor Sebastian, and was commissioned by the Asociación de Empresarios Mexicanos (translated as “Association of Mexican Businesspeople”) as a gift from the Mexican government. It was unveiled on June 28, 2002.

Summary
Torch of the Americas is a step past the Alamo
Article Name
Torch of the Americas is a step past the Alamo
Description
The Torch of Friendship in San Antonio, Texas, was a gift from the Mexican government, which once fought at the city's Alamo in a war to maintain possession of the territory.
Author

About Andy Crawford

Andy Crawford has been a photographer and writer for more than 20 years, with thousands of images and articles published in magazines and newspapers around the country. He now focuses on Louisiana photography, landscapes, HDR photography, urban prints and other fine art photography. He also is a portrait photographer.